Chris Reich, Presentation Creation Services http://chrisreich.org I help business people with professional presentations Thu, 22 Mar 2018 16:14:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.5 Presentation Tip: When to Use a Handout http://chrisreich.org/presentation-tip-use-handout/ Mon, 09 Oct 2017 17:21:03 +0000 http://chrisreich.org/?p=123186 The post Presentation Tip: When to Use a Handout appeared first on Chris Reich, Presentation Creation Services.

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Problem: What to Do When You Have 10 Minutes to Present a Very Complex Idea?

Simple! Use a handout!

I understand the need to limit presentation time. Without such limits, meetings would go on forever. But it doesn’t make sense to put every presentation under the same limit unless all the presentations have the same content. For example, if 4 sales managers are reporting results from 4 different regions, then it makes sense to have all 4 presenters follow a consistent format and stay within a given time frame.

When someone asks to present an idea that might generate new revenue for the company, it doesn’t make sense to put that presenter under the same constraints. Must she use the same template as the sales managers? Must he be limited to 5 slides and 10 minutes? Why?

It may not make sense but it happens all the time. People call me with a request like this, “I have a new idea for the hospital but I need to present a bunch of technical data. Problem is, I only have 10 minutes and they ask us to use 5 or fewer slides.” While the limitations are rather arbitrary, they exist and the presenter is stuck with them. That is an ideal time to create a handout.

Use your slides to make impact and the handout to support your conclusions and proposal. In simple terms, put the supporting data and complex charts on the handout. Your first slide says something like, “We have a serious problem with Post-Op infection and I would like to propose a solution.”  The handout would show the supporting statisical data for how you identified the problem. The slide may say that your facility experiences a 9% post-op infection rate compared to the national average of 2.3%. Your handout would show the data in detail and provide sources of data.

This is just one of the many ways a handout can be used. Too much trouble? Naw. You can create your handout in PowerPoint. That makes layout easy and keeps everything in a asingle file. Put your slides up front, followed by what you intend to be your handout. When done, print only the handout slides. Easy!

By the way, this works great when speaking at a conference too. Why? Because attendees walk away with something with your name on it.

The presentation is too often treated as a replacement for a handout. The two parts should work together.

Chris Reich, Making Presentations Better Every Day!

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Business Speaking Tip #3 http://chrisreich.org/business-speaking-tip-3/ Wed, 10 May 2017 21:06:39 +0000 http://chrisreich.org/?p=25837 I have a tip that will shock and surprise you. You won't read it anywhere else. It might be the most important tip you ever read if you do a lot of presenting.

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Presentation/Speaker Tip by Chris Reich

Important Tip for Making That Big Presentation

I have a tip that will shock and surprise you. You won’t read it anywhere else. It might be the most important tip you ever read if you do a lot of presenting.

Does your throat ever feel a little congested before you take the stage? Have you ever felt a little hoarse after speaking for a long time? That happens when we are called upon to conduct trainings. I know my throat feels raw after speaking for a full day and I sometimes dread the second day of a two-day class.

Stress can add to your throat feeling tight. Fear or anxiety can give us the proverbial “lump in the throat” feeling. Emotional drain is the source of the common “lump in the throat”. 

I’ve had clients express fear of things like cancer because they feel actual constriction in the throat.

You may not have it quite that bad, but regardless of the degree of throat congestion you feel, I would bet you are doing something very harmful to your throat. This is so harmful, you might cause permanent damage to your vocal chords.

What is it?

Clearing your throat.

Don’t scoff. This is serious medical advice. Unless you have a hunk of rubber chicken from lunch trapped in your windpipe, do not clear your throat.

You will say, “come on, I just need to clear my throat before starting my speech.” Throat clearing is like eating one potato chip. You can’t, and won’t, just do it once. You may form a habit. You have seen people who are constantly clearing their throat? That’s because clearing the throat makes it worse and spurs a need to again clear the throat.

Okay, this sounds like I’m making a big deal over a small thing. I’m not.

I recently had a very severe bout of hoarseness after doing a lot of speaking at various events and while serving as an interim executive of a company. During a routine dental exam, the dentist asked if he could examine my neck. After feeling around he said, “I think you should see your doctor right away.” That scared the hell out of me.

My doctor performed a thorough exam and then said, “you feel a lump in your throat?” “Yes,” I replied.
“You clear your throat often.”  “Yes, I do,” I told him.
“Stop clearing your throat and this will clear up,” he told me.

Every time we clear our throat, we grind our vocal chords together. Even once or twice before speaking is bad. How bad? Bad enough to do damage. Clear your throat before speaking and you’ll be more hoarse after your speech than had you not cleared your throat.

What to do instead?

  • Drink warm coffee or tea (without milk)
  • Take a cough lozenge
  • Suck a hard candy (my method of choice)
  • Drink some water if nothing else is available

There is a neat product called “Entertainer’s Secret”. It’s expensive but it works.

This may seem like I’m making a big deal of a small thing. Seriously, if you must make an important presentation or conduct a long training, do not clear your throat. You’ll make it worse and do damage.

Don’t believe me? See if you can fight the urge to clear your throat. If you can’t, you have a problem. The habit is formed. Drink a little water and resist. Within days you’ll see a big improvement in your voice and voice stamina.

And if you have a worrisome “lump in the throat”? Get it checked—you’re probably fine. And then stop clearing your throat. My voice cleared up quickly.

Let me reinforce this tip. Don’t clear your voice in advance of an important presentation. Remember, many things contribute to that “lump in the throat” feeling. Stress, fear, fatigue, and allergies can give you some mucus in the throat. Don’t clear your throat as that grinds the vocal chords and leads to the production of more mucus. Drink something or take a hard candy.

Protect your voice. As a great speaker and presenter, you’ll need it!

Chris Reich, Presentation Specialist and Speaker Instructor

 

 

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Business Presentation Tip #2 http://chrisreich.org/business-presentation-tip-2/ http://chrisreich.org/business-presentation-tip-2/#respond Sun, 02 Apr 2017 18:10:22 +0000 http://chrisreich.org/?p=25802 Avoid Dancing Baloney! I seldom use transitions. When I see presentations with slides flipping in, rotating and checker-boarding in and out, I feel ill. Why do some people insist that it “breaks things up”? It breaks things. Agreed. You can use “builds” where appropriate. That’s having a bullet list appear one item at a time. […]

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Don't Add Dancing Baloney to Your Presentations!

Avoid Dancing Baloney!

I seldom use transitions. When I see presentations with slides flipping in, rotating and checker-boarding in and out, I feel ill. Why do some people insist that it “breaks things up”? It breaks things. Agreed.

You can use “builds” where appropriate. That’s having a bullet list appear one item at a time. That can help you control the flow. If 10 items pop up, people start reading. If you are explaining a series of steps, it’s better to have them appear one at a time. But I wouldn’t have them bouncing in. The goal is not to give everyone motion sickness!

There is a place for these tools but they are over used.

Just because you figure out how doesn’t mean you should.

In presentation, less is almost always more. If you need action, incorporate a video.

Chris Reich, Presentation Services

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Business Presentation Design Tip #1 http://chrisreich.org/business-presentation-design-tip-1/ http://chrisreich.org/business-presentation-design-tip-1/#respond Sat, 01 Apr 2017 23:33:39 +0000 http://chrisreich.org/?p=25786 The post Business Presentation Design Tip #1 appeared first on Chris Reich, Presentation Creation Services.

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Presentation Tips from Chris Reich

Presentation Design Matters and It's Easy

Business Presentation Design Tip #1

Just how important is business presentation design?

Design is very important. While we tend to stress content, and particularly the goal of the presentation, the design matters too.

The “look” of your presentation is the first impression your audience gets. Think about that. The first information you convey is derived from your design.

That’s important. Here’s a tip. Making everything more simple adds to the appearance.

I have taken presentations that an executive spent hours designing and cut out most of the “design” elements. When I send it back, I always get the comment, “wow, that looks sharp, professional.”

By removing noise, we improve communication.

  • Take away unnecessary backgrounds.
  • Use clear, easy-to-read fonts.
  • Eliminate confusing graphics.
  • Reduce the total number of colors.
  • Cut back the words.

Guess what you end up with!

A clean, crisp, easy to digest presentation. That doesn’t come from adding stuff in. That professionalism comes from what I remove.

Never, ever forget that good business presentation design comes from subtraction, not addition.

Chris@ChrisReich.org

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